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DIFFERENCE BETWEEN DE FACTO AND DE JURE

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DIFFERENCE BETWEEN DE FACTO AND DE JURE

In law and government, de facto describes practises that exist in reality, even though they are not officially recognized by laws.

In law and government, de jure describes practises that are legally recognised, regardless of whether the practices exists in reality.

Factual recognition is known as De Facto.

Legal recognition is known as De Jure.

De facto is temporary. It is not important like De Jure. It is a temporary and provisional recognition which can be withdrawn.

De jure which is a legal recognition is a permanent recognition and it cannot be withdrawn .

The recognition that is conferred by defacto is a based on a factual situation and is not a process of law.

De jure is a recognition given after following due procedure of law.

Diplomatic representation are exchanged.

Under de jure, rules of state succession are applied.

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